Technology can’t erase memories of ad jingles

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In a noble attempt to make us technology-relevant, our kids have, over the years, given us a number of electronic devices as Christmas presents. These have included a video camera, hardware and software for our computer, a digital camera, a webcam, CD and DVD players, whatever.

And except for the digital camera (which Marilyn carried with her everywhere for years, until she got a smartphone), the one that had the most impact, I suppose, was our TiVo. TiVo was a revolutionary way to watch TV. It put us in control of what we watched, and when we watched it. It managed our TV for us so that we never had to miss our favorite programs. And we didn’t have to schedule other activities around the TV.

Well, now our TiVo has been replaced by our DVR, which operates on almost exactly the same principles as the TiVo did. The sweetest part of this radical new management of TV is something called the “Season Series.” Instead of having to set our old VCR to record programs each day, we simply tell the DVR which programs we always like to watch. For instance, if we tell it we want to have a season series of “Madam Secretary” or “Designated Survivor,” the DVR will record them whenever they’re on. And will even sort out the reruns.

Our recorded programs are ready to watch at any time. We can even start watching a program while it’s still recording! And if we happen to be watching something “live,” which we rarely do except for the news and sports, and the phone rings or something, we can just hit “pause” and the DVR automatically starts recording, so we can go back to where we were before the phone interrupted. How cool is that?

Since we have owned the TiVo and now the DVR, I have become very powerful. Who decides what time the Packers or Badgers kick off? I do. Who decides what instant replays (and how many) there will be? I do. Who eliminates TV timeouts and commercials? I do.

So, except for sports, we seldom watch live TV anymore. That’s because we fast forward through commercials, which means we don’t know what the latest products are or who’s shilling what product. So we also don’t know about the latest clever jingles like in the old days. (Well, except for “Nationwide is on your side.”)

That made me think of a lot of the old jingles from the “good old days” before TiVo or DVR. How many of these do you remember?

“Double your pleasure, double your fun.” “A little dab’ll do ya.” “Have you had your soup today?” “See the USA in your ____“ sung by Dinah Shore. “Nothin’ says lovin like somethin’ from the oven.”

“_____tastes good like a cigarette should.” “You’ll wonder where the yellow went when you brush your teeth with ____.” “Snap, Crackle, and Pop!” “When you say ___ you’ve said it all.” “The best part of waking up is ____in your cup.” “Like a good neighbor ____ _____ is there.” “I’d like to teach the world to sing.” “Have it your way, hold the pickles, hold the lettuce.” “Wouldn’t you like to be a _____ too?” “Hot dogs, _____Hot Dogs.”

“You deserve a break today.” “I wish I was an ____ ____ weiner.” “Plop, plop, fizz, fizz, Oh what a relief it is.” “Two all-beef patties, special sauce.” “The P-nuttiest.” “A kid’ll eat the middle first…” “_____, the foaming cleanser.” “____ kills bugs dead.” “__ ___ pops in its own pan.” “____, everybody, ____, _____ is the shampoo that glorifies your hair.” “You can trust your car to the man who wears the star.”

Some of those jingles and catch phrases go back to the days when I was in high and college, but I still remember them. Goofy, huh?

Contact Roger VanHaren at rjmavh@gmail.com.