Opinions

Wed
20
Mar

VanHaren: From six-on-six to the full-court press

I live in Beaver Dam, and the real buzz around here is the third consecutive state championship won by our high school girls basketball team. These girls have lost only five games in the last four years, and only one of those losses was to a team from Wisconsin. This year, for example, their only loss was to Miami Country Day, the No. 1-ranked high school team in the nation.

The Beaver Dam girls play a fast-paced, full-court, trapping defense that would be the envy of many boys teams. They routinely beat their opponents by 20 or 30 points while playing all 15 of their players. They don’t attempt to “pour it on” against anyone. The starters play very few second-half minutes.

Wed
13
Mar

VanHaren: Films capture the drama of scaling mountains

When he graduated with the Wayland Academy class of 1992, his classmates voted him “Most Likely to Succeed.” Three weeks ago he won the Oscar for his documentary film, “Free Solo.” “Free Solo” also won the People’s Choice Award: Documentary. Additionally, the film received the BAFTA Award for Best Documentary in 2019.

I did not have Jimmy Chin as a student in any of my classes at Wayland, but it was evident from observing him around campus that he had a special knack for dealing with people. Jimmy played soccer, participated in Model UN, was a proctor in the dorm, and worked on the school’s literary magazine.

Today, Jimmy Chin is a professional climber, mountaineer, skier, photographer, and film director. Jimmy grew up in Mankato, Minnesota, the son of Chinese immigrant parents. Living in Minnesota is hardly a good preparation for becoming a world-class mountain-climber and photographer.

Wed
13
Mar

Salute: Thanks for Love Basket support

To the editor:

The colleagues of HSHS St. Clare Memorial Hospital wish to thank our community members, fellow employees, and local businesses for their continued support through the years of our annual Love Basket Raffle/Luncheon. We had such a wonderful assortment of baskets this year, totaling 68.

Our gratitude to Eslien Law Office, Witt’s Piggly Wiggy, Dr. Ristow DDS, Riverview QMart, Patriot Golf Course, The Flower Shoppe, Forever, Keller Williams, Building Art and Soul LLC, Total Exteriors, The Antique Bar, NEW Credit Union, J Just Investments, United True Value, Deam Video Productions, Barnstormers’ Restaurant, Oconto Electric Cooperative, Lakeside Breeze, Norwex, Pink Zebra, and The Cottages.

Dawn Coppens,

Oconto Falls

Wed
13
Mar

Salute: Breakfast was a success

To the editor:

The Suring Area Historical Society would like to thank everyone who participated in making the Feb. 10 Paul Bunyan Style Breakfast Successful.

A delicious pancake breakfast was served by the Hayes St. John Youth Group at the St. John Multi-Purpose Room, which was enjoyed by all 206 guests. The recognition of Anna Holl, our former general store owner in Hayes, was the big attraction.

Anna always had bins of candy and snacks for sale, which attracted the children, so the SAHS had jars of candies, Fruit Loops and Cheese Puffs for the guests to put in a guess as to how many pieces were in the jars. Winners of this guessing contest were Jane Gondeck, Sharon Jansen, Willie Miller, Debbie School and Tina Hanson.

Wed
06
Mar

VanHaren: Memories of dipping smelt at Brookside

It doesn’t take much of a nudge to make the DVR in my brain slip into triple-rewind and bring back some amazingly clear pictures of stuff that happened when I was a kid. For example, in the process of looking for some information about something (I can’t even remember now what it was; how’s that for a memory problem?), I saw a church ad for a spring “smelt fry” somewhere in the Upper Peninsula.

Wow! A smelt fry! Have you ever been to a smelt fry? Or have you ever gone dipping smelt?

Before I get too far into this topic, does everyone know what smelt are? Smelt are small, edible, silver-colored, minnow-like fish that can grow up to 12 inches in length (but typically the ones we caught were about 4 or 5 inches long).

Wed
06
Mar

Salute: Thanks to fifth-graders and everyone involved

To the Editor:

For the past several years, Marinette & Oconto Counties Literacy Council has hosted an annual fundraiser by joining with Oconto Falls Elementary School for the following game: “Are You Smarter than an Oconto Falls Fifth-Grader?” This event has proven to be both fun and educational for the students, adult panel and audience as well.

The fifth-grade students are to be commended for their enthusiasm and their knowledge. Of course, the adult panel needs praise also, as it is not easy to come up with a quick answer when asked in front of an audience. Kudos to both groups as they did well when under pressure!

Wed
27
Feb

VanHaren: What’s so fascinating about cards?

I have five different solitaire games on my phone, and I play each of them at least once every day. My favorite game is one called “Spider,” but I also play “Crown,” “Tri-peak,” “Pyramid” and “Classic Solitaire.” The hardest to win is Classic; the others are all about equally hard.

The only other card games I play are cribbage, bridge and “Hand, Foot and Toe,” which I’m told is sort of like Canasta. It’s interesting to me that in some games, like bridge, the suits are important, but that’s not true in some other games.

So I got to thinking about the suits; why are there four suits? And why are they called spades, hearts, diamonds and clubs? The next logical step: Do some research. “OK, Google, why are there four suits and how did they originate?” (You talk to your smart phone, too, don’t you?)

Wed
20
Feb

VanHaren: Seven-buckle galoshes were an essential winter accessory

Dear readers: Another busy week of appointments and health issues, so I’m offering another “oldie” from March 2008.

Do you remember galoshes?

Isn’t that a great old word? I don’t think I’d heard anyone use it for a long time. Then one day a week or so ago, I saw a reference to a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta I wasn’t familiar with (“Thespis” — anyone know it?), so I looked it up on the net. And there in a stage direction, I found this statement: “ [During chorus, enter Diana, an elderly goddess. She is carefully wrapped up in cloaks, shawls, etc. A hood is over her head, a respirator in her mouth, and galoshes on her feet. During the chorus, she takes these things off and discovers herself dressed in the usual costume of the Lunar Diana, the goddess of the moon.]”

Tue
12
Feb

VanHaren: 'Uncle' was card player while 'aunt' took cookie recipe to grave

We called them “Uncle Albert” and “Aunt Annie,” even though they were not directly related to us. Albert and Anne Konitzer lived across the road from us on Konitzer Road south of Oconto Falls. We were surrounded by Konitzers in those days, but only one of the families (our Uncle George, Aunt Irene and their 15 kids) were directly related to us. Aunt Irene was our dad’s younger sister.

But to my sister Joyce and me, Uncle Albert and Aunt Annie were “special” relatives. They were also Joyce’s godparents. They were a generation older than our “regular” aunts and uncles, contemporaries of our Grandpa VanHaren, who lived with us on the home farm.

Uncle Albert and Aunt Annie’s son, Greg (the best man at our parents’ wedding), took over the family farm about the same time our parents took over the VanHaren homestead. They remodeled the family home, and Uncle Albert and Aunt Annie lived in an upstairs apartment in the house until they passed away in the mid-’60s.

Wed
06
Feb

Roger VanHaren: Snow and cold snap remind us of other bad winters

“The weather outside is frightful …”

As I’m writing this, the outside temperature is minus-27, and the wind chill factor is making it feel like -50. Frightful! I’m thankful that I don’t have to be out in the cold for any amount of time, but I did go out to fill my bird feeders because the frenzy of activity out there has been nearly triple what it has been leading up to this cold snap. Perhaps some of our neighbors have not braved the elements to fill their feeders, so all the birds are making their way to our yard.

I was outside for less than than 10 minutes in the knee-deep snow. Mother Nature dropped a foot of the gorgeous white stuff, and the wind has piled it up drifts in the back yard. It’s well above the tops of my boots. I was wearing cotton-lined leather work gloves, and by the time I’d finished filling the feeders, my fingers were so numb that I was having trouble holding on to the scoop.

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