Opinions

Wed
11
Dec

Iowa experience reveals all things are relative

Perhaps not all things are relative, but the theory of relativity or a version of it was a cause for some speculation as this observer took leave of the path around the Falls this past weekend. Some 38 years ago, this observer accepted the offer of a fellow teacher to head to the remote reaches of rural northwestern Iowa for a first taste of a whitetail hunt.

Except for once or maybe twice in that time, the trip has been a key component of a self-prescribed personal wellness program. This year marked the first year that a third-generation descendant of that original group, and the first female, joined the party. She has a great success story to tell, but we will leave that for another time and place.

Wed
11
Dec

Get involved to keep snowmobiling strong

To the editor:

Wonder how those snowmobile trails magically appear each year just in time for riding fun? Snowmobile club volunteers spend countless hours working with landowners, putting up signs, brushing trails and getting grooming equipment ready.

There are over 20,000 miles of trails across Wisconsin. Trails are maintained by nearly 600 clubs, with local club efforts coordinated by the Association of Wisconsin Snowmobile Clubs. More information about AWSC can be found on its website at www.awsc.org.

Safety is always on the minds of responsible snowmobilers. The AWSC encourages riders to watch their speed and drink alcoholic beverages responsibly, if at all, while riding. There is a nighttime 55 mph speed limit for snowmobiles. Riders are also reminded that machines must slow to 10 mph when in the vicinity of pedestrians, dwellings or fishermen.

Wed
11
Dec

Veterans overlooked in game-day tribute

To the editor:

I am a loyal Packers fan, but after Sunday’s pregame performance, I have my doubts.

Just before our national anthem, they had a moment of silence for Nelson Mandela. I know he was a great man and did a lot for the equality of South Africa, but there was never a mention of our armed forces and civilians who died on Dec. 7, 1941. To me that was just another slap in the face to all who served this great country.

Oh, by the way, when Margaret Thatcher died, nothing was said.

As for our veterans, just give them apples and pencils to sell on the street corner.

Having served two tours in Vietnam, I think I have earned my right to bitch.

Jay Tousey

Suring

Wed
04
Dec

Turning our thoughts to December’s traditions

The cold snap that came to the path around the Falls the weekend before Thanksgiving did a lot to solidify things. Many Wisconsinites took the opportunity to head to the woods.

On Saturday, pools of water had light skins of ice. By Sunday morning, shallow bodies of water were solid enough to walk across without that dreaded cracking sound.

The downturn in temperatures also affected many farm operations. Fall tillage had been under way, but that Sunday also marked the end of the fall season for working the fields. The soil was frozen and not to be disturbed from its winter slumber.

Winter temperatures and the associated costs for heating are one of the variables over which school districts have little control. Budget high, and a warm winter can make a school superintendent look like a financial genius. Miss the mark when Mother Nature blesses us with a colder than usual winter, and eyebrows are raised at budget review time.

Wed
04
Dec

Exercise those cranial muscles by memorization

My dad was a good storyteller. Unfortunately, as he grew nearer to the end of his life, he told the same stories over and over. But one of his stories always tickled me. Dad told of a time when he was in grade school, shortly after the first World War, and the nun assigned the kids to memorize “In Flanders Field,” a popular poem from the war.

Dad absolutely could not get it, so he was sentenced to stay after school every day until he could recite it. That was a problem, too, because he lived three miles from school and had to walk home alone every night.

Then, one day, after he’d been sitting sullenly with his head down on the desk, he noticed a framed picture of the poem on the wall next to his desk.

“Sister, I can do it!” So he read the poem off the wall, and he was free.

“In Flanders fields the poppies blow/Between the crosses, row on row,/That mark our place; and in the sky/The larks, still bravely singing, fly/Scarce heard amid the guns below.”

Wed
27
Nov

Daybreak trip adds to hunting experience

Thursday night’s northbound traffic heading out of Green Bay toward the path around the Falls may not have been bumper-to-bumper, but it was a very steady stream of vehicles loaded down with coolers and other supplies. This was part of the migration toward those many different deer camps “up nort.”

Mixed in the flow were vehicles pulling trailers with four-wheelers to help the hunters get further into the woods. Even though it was dark, one could sense there was a lot of anticipation bubbling in those vehicles.

Much has been written about the economic impact of Wisconsin’s annual whitetail hunt. There is no question that a fair amount of money changes hands in the process. A late Thursday afternoon stop at a major grocery store in Green Bay provided several observations of guys pushing grocery carts and working through lists for deer camp.

Wed
27
Nov

Today’s society is swamped by weather predictions

I ran into a funny article a few weeks ago when I was looking for stuff about meteorology. It included a list of actual names of weather people, the folks who provide our daily doses of information about our atmospheric conditions.

A couple of my favorites from the list: Ray Ban, of the Weather Channel; Storm E. Field, of WABC, New York; Amy Freeze, also of WABC (if she has nieces and nephews, do they call her Auntie Freeze?); Sunny Haus, of KARE in Minneapolis; Dallas Raines, of KABC in Los Angeles; Ken Weathers, of WATE in Knoxville; and Larry Sprinkle, of WCNC in Charlotte.

I was doing a little research because I was curious about the business of weather prognostication and the amount of interest it receives in our world. After watching a weather forecast on a Milwaukee TV station a while back, it occurred to me that we place a very heavy emphasis on the subject.

Wed
27
Nov

Volunteer affirms the value of hospice care

To the editor:

My husband, Ronald Carviou, was cared for by hospice when he was dying, and I will be eternally grateful for the support and care they gave to both him and me. After he died, I realized that I wanted to pass on some of that love and support so I became a hospice volunteer with Unity.

Hospice and palliative care combines the highest level of quality medical care with the emotional and spiritual support that families need most when facing the end of life.

Trained volunteers are essential members of the care team, and there are more than 288 in our community along with more than 458,000 volunteers throughout the country bringing comfort, love and respect to those in need.

Wed
20
Nov

Inspiration of Kennedy lives on

Even though it may have been far from the path around the Falls, the vast majority of the Boomer Generation can tell you exactly where they were 50 years ago this Friday. It was a Friday afternoon, and most were in class. They might remember the class, the room and maybe where they were positioned in the room when they got the word that President Kennedy had been shot.

Instruction ground to a halt. Some teachers tuned in the classroom radio to the constant flow of news bulletins. Other classes gathered around television sets in assembly rooms. Some schools dismissed early. Prayers were recited in public school classrooms, and no one raised any fuss about that. Across the nation it felt like the life was sucked out of hearts young and old. The nation felt that a good portion of its innocence was wretched away.

Wed
20
Nov

ZIP system keeps mail flowing

In Act I of Madison native Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town,” Rebecca, the central character, tells her brother about a letter her friend received.

Here’s the dialogue:

Rebecca: “I never told you about that letter Jane Crofut got from her minister when she was sick. He wrote Jane a letter and on the envelope the address was like this: It said: Jane Crofut; The Crofut Farm; Grover’s Corners; Sutton County; New Hampshire; United States of America.”

George: “What’s funny about that?”

Rebecca: “But listen, it’s not finished: the United States of America; Continent of North America; Western Hemisphere; the Earth; the Solar System; the Universe; the Mind of God—that’s what it said on the envelope.”

George: “What do you know!”

Rebecca: “And the postman brought it just the same.”

George: “What do you know!”

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