Opinions

Wed
19
Oct

Wimberger is good choice for state Senate

To the editor:

When Sen. David Hansen fled to Illinois to avoid voting on the state budget bill, he permanently lost my vote. Many voters in Northeast Wisconsin feel the same way.

After 20 years of favoring special interests instead of his constituents, it is time for David Hansen to retire. Fortunately, there is a candidate with experience, skill and dedication to limited government.

Eric Wimberger is a graduate of De Pere High School. He received an undergraduate degree in criminal justice from St. Cloud State University, where he served as student body president. After graduation, Eric drove semi-truck for Schneider National to earn money to attend law school.

Upon graduation from Marquette University Law School, Eric was commissioned in the United States Marine Corps as judge advocate, eventually reaching the rank of captain.

In 2010, Eric opened his law offices in downtown Green Bay.

Wed
19
Oct

2 reasons not to vote for Tiffany

To the editor:

There are many reasons not to vote for Tom Tiffany. Let’s look at two of them.

It’s hard to imagine anyone weaving a greater web of deception than Tom Tiffany did when he was peddling his iron mining bill.

Indeed, he was lying to the people of Wisconsin when he claimed that the intent of the bill was to have separate law for iron mining because it has fewer “risk factors” than other forms of mining. The real intent of Tom Tiffany’s bill was to add “risk factors” by allowing substantially greater damage to the state’s natural resources than would have been allowed under the metallic mining law. This was meant to provide a “low cost” mine for his client.

Wed
19
Oct

Tiffany is strong advocate of veterans

To the editor:

As a Vietnam veteran, I am writing in support of Sen. Tom Tiffany’s re-election to the Wisconsin state Senate and his efforts on behalf of veterans.

After only being in office a few months, then-Rep. Tiffany voted to provide $5 million to the veterans trust fund, the first time such an infusion from the state’s general fund had occurred since 1988. The VTF has been the main source of providing Wisconsin’s veterans and their families essential services and benefits.

Beyond the VTF, also during his first year in office, Tom voted to provide nearly $7 million, which helped to finally open the Veterans Home at Chippewa Falls. Northern Wisconsin is now home to two of Wisconsin’s three veterans homes.

Wed
19
Oct

Writer calls for Walker’s resignation

To the editor:

Over the last five years of the Walker administration, Wisconsin has gone backward in almost every imaginable way. Minnesota is our kindred neighbor. At one time, we were roughly the same in most measurements. Not anymore. Minnesota has run away from us, because they did not re-enter the Dark Ages like Scott Walker’s Wisconsin did. Wisconsin citizens were evidently fooled by his son-of-a-preacher-man image.

Many people have been hurt by his administration’s policies and theology. Agencies like the Department of Commerce, Government Accountability Board and Department of Natural Resources were politicized. Our attorney general drinks the same Kool Aid.

Our Supreme Court has been bought as well. Public education now has a massive shortage of teachers and professors. The list goes on.

Today, despite Republicans passing law after law closing the curtains on our government, we find out who the Walker administration’s friends are. Like

Wed
19
Oct

Rural education suffering under Tiffany

To the editor:

Northwoods students are getting short-changed when it comes to education. While there have always been differences between city and rural schools, adequate state funding helped level the playing field. Not anymore.

Thanks to Republicans like Scott Walker and Tom Tiffany, our rural schools are being starved to death in many ways. Here are just three:

Staff: Funding caps had already decimated faculties and services. Act 10 made things much worse. Experienced teachers retired; fewer students went into teaching. The resulting shortage makes teachers free agents. Small-town schools like mine seem like minor league teams, developing great teachers who leave for better pay and benefits elsewhere.

Wed
19
Oct

Bravely facing ‘assembly required’ challenge

Last week, we went to see and hear one of my favorite writers, Michael Perry. He was appearing with his band, The Longbeds.

We’ve seen Michael a couple times before, but this was the first time we’d heard his band, and it was a really fun evening. Michael told stories and sang in a three-hour concert that didn’t seem nearly that long. “Times goes fast when you’re having fun!”

One of the things he talked about was a question I hear very often: “How do you come up with the ideas for your column?” And his answer was sort of like mine always is: “I listen and I watch and I pay attention to what’s going on around me - and I have a memory which is chock full of goofy stuff. Sometimes people say, “You should write about …”

Wed
12
Oct

Writer poses questions about Pulaski’s new stadium

To the editor:

Some things never change, and that goes for the Pulaski Community School District. After overall approval by the board to borrow $2.8 million to build the Field of Dreams in the hopes of getting donations, what happens when they do not meet their goal? This would affect the already strained budget, and the burden would be placed on taxpayers.

Two mailers were sent out begging for donations for their Field of Dreams. One has to wonder, was this sent out with taxpayer money? Another question — who is paying the staff when they are coordinating this project during work hours? I believe that would be the taxpayer again.

When there was raw sewage damage in neighboring homes when the construction company broke a line while constructing the sports complex, nothing was mentioned at school board meetings.

Wed
12
Oct

Bubble Wrap, a pop culture icon

We recently got a shipment of my medication, which came wrapped in several wonderful sheets of bubble wrap! Enough for a couple of hours of bubble-popping therapy!

Oh, come on. Admit it. You know you like popping those wonderful little pockets of air just as much as I do. Popping Bubble Wrap (that’s a copyrighted brand name, by the way, but it’s been genericized by now) is sort of cathartic. It’s one of those little acts of destruction that’s neither offensive nor harmful. And besides, that little popping sound is sort of relaxing.

I’ve often wondered if someone (someone much more musical than I am) could take sheets of bubble wrap of various sizes and play music with them. The different sizes would have to make different pitches, wouldn’t they? The bigger the bubble, the lower the note, right?

Wed
05
Oct

Writer impressed with Gallagher

To the editor:

I’m writing to encourage fellow 8th District Wisconsinites to vote for Mike Gallagher for our congressman. I like that Mike believes politics should be a term of service to the country and once that term is complete, public servants should go back to their regular lives.

Mike has pledged to lead efforts to tie congressional pay to passing budgets, to eliminating congressional pensions and to freezing congressional pay.

I like that from his experiences — working in his family’s Green Bay pizza restaurant growing up, serving as a Marine, serving in our nation’s intelligence community and then in the private sector as a strategist for a

Green Bay-based energy company — Mike has a solid basis of knowledge about the world and about economic issues in our country.

Wed
05
Oct

Choose candidate who can mold future

To the editor:

This election is getting far too reckless. We have a two-party system that allows them equal opportunity to put forth their platforms and convince the public which is best for the current situations.

One party has been pirated by a populist opportunist who is totally unprepared and unqualified to be the most powerful person in the world. This could have happened to either party.

If this coup-de-tat is legitimately supported, it represents a split in one party. What this would mean for the future is wide open to speculation, but leaders of both parties don’t want to find out.

While populist rhetoric raises the temperature, it is in no way a litmus test for governance of the world.

One party is offering a legitimate and realistic vision for the future, while the other offers vicious attacks, impossible promises and flip-flops.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Opinions