Opinions

Wed
27
Nov

Daybreak trip adds to hunting experience

Thursday night’s northbound traffic heading out of Green Bay toward the path around the Falls may not have been bumper-to-bumper, but it was a very steady stream of vehicles loaded down with coolers and other supplies. This was part of the migration toward those many different deer camps “up nort.”

Mixed in the flow were vehicles pulling trailers with four-wheelers to help the hunters get further into the woods. Even though it was dark, one could sense there was a lot of anticipation bubbling in those vehicles.

Much has been written about the economic impact of Wisconsin’s annual whitetail hunt. There is no question that a fair amount of money changes hands in the process. A late Thursday afternoon stop at a major grocery store in Green Bay provided several observations of guys pushing grocery carts and working through lists for deer camp.

Wed
27
Nov

Today’s society is swamped by weather predictions

I ran into a funny article a few weeks ago when I was looking for stuff about meteorology. It included a list of actual names of weather people, the folks who provide our daily doses of information about our atmospheric conditions.

A couple of my favorites from the list: Ray Ban, of the Weather Channel; Storm E. Field, of WABC, New York; Amy Freeze, also of WABC (if she has nieces and nephews, do they call her Auntie Freeze?); Sunny Haus, of KARE in Minneapolis; Dallas Raines, of KABC in Los Angeles; Ken Weathers, of WATE in Knoxville; and Larry Sprinkle, of WCNC in Charlotte.

I was doing a little research because I was curious about the business of weather prognostication and the amount of interest it receives in our world. After watching a weather forecast on a Milwaukee TV station a while back, it occurred to me that we place a very heavy emphasis on the subject.

Wed
27
Nov

Volunteer affirms the value of hospice care

To the editor:

My husband, Ronald Carviou, was cared for by hospice when he was dying, and I will be eternally grateful for the support and care they gave to both him and me. After he died, I realized that I wanted to pass on some of that love and support so I became a hospice volunteer with Unity.

Hospice and palliative care combines the highest level of quality medical care with the emotional and spiritual support that families need most when facing the end of life.

Trained volunteers are essential members of the care team, and there are more than 288 in our community along with more than 458,000 volunteers throughout the country bringing comfort, love and respect to those in need.

Wed
20
Nov

Inspiration of Kennedy lives on

Even though it may have been far from the path around the Falls, the vast majority of the Boomer Generation can tell you exactly where they were 50 years ago this Friday. It was a Friday afternoon, and most were in class. They might remember the class, the room and maybe where they were positioned in the room when they got the word that President Kennedy had been shot.

Instruction ground to a halt. Some teachers tuned in the classroom radio to the constant flow of news bulletins. Other classes gathered around television sets in assembly rooms. Some schools dismissed early. Prayers were recited in public school classrooms, and no one raised any fuss about that. Across the nation it felt like the life was sucked out of hearts young and old. The nation felt that a good portion of its innocence was wretched away.

Wed
20
Nov

ZIP system keeps mail flowing

In Act I of Madison native Thornton Wilder’s “Our Town,” Rebecca, the central character, tells her brother about a letter her friend received.

Here’s the dialogue:

Rebecca: “I never told you about that letter Jane Crofut got from her minister when she was sick. He wrote Jane a letter and on the envelope the address was like this: It said: Jane Crofut; The Crofut Farm; Grover’s Corners; Sutton County; New Hampshire; United States of America.”

George: “What’s funny about that?”

Rebecca: “But listen, it’s not finished: the United States of America; Continent of North America; Western Hemisphere; the Earth; the Solar System; the Universe; the Mind of God—that’s what it said on the envelope.”

George: “What do you know!”

Rebecca: “And the postman brought it just the same.”

George: “What do you know!”

Wed
13
Nov

‘Agony of defeat’ felt by Panther faithful

Before those living along the path around the Falls had access to a multitude of sports channels, “The thrill of victory and the agony of defeat,” clued viewers that ABC’s “Wide World of Sports” was about to start. The series featured a great variety of venues and the emotions that played out on each. During the past several days those same emotions were experienced by many who travel the path.

Friday’s appearance of the Lady Panthers at the state volleyball tournament brought an early start to the weekend. The early release allowed many students, staff and parents to show support for the team at the Resch Center. The contest was slated to begin at 4 in the afternoon, but fans could not enter the arena until it had been cleared after the earlier session. Once done, fans began working their way to the ticket scanners.

Wed
13
Nov

Encyclopedia sales belong to bygone era

One of my all-time favorite sit-com characters was a guy named Mr. Herd on the old “Bob Newhart Show.” Oliver Clark played Mr. Herd in just eight episodes of the show, but I always loved him. Do you remember him? He was the very shy, self-deprecating guy whose tie was always upside down.

In one episode he told of how he’d taken a job selling door-to-door. He said he’d gone up onto the porch and stood there all day hoping for someone to come out and buy his product.

I spent one day as a door-to-door salesman in the summer of 1958. I was 19 years old and pretty naive. I had just finished my freshman year in college, and I needed a summer job. The only jobs available in my hometown were canning factory labor, and I really didn’t want to do that. I saw an ad in the Oshkosh Northwestern looking for students to conduct a “survey.”

Wed
06
Nov

The greatest thing since sliced bread

I’m a big fan of Garrison Keillor’s “Writers Almanac” on public radio; I even subscribe to a daily email of the program.

I’m pretty sure that Keillor has researchers who dig up the information he spotlights on the show, but his delivery of the content and his daily poem are very entertaining.

On July 7, he started the program with this item: “Sliced bread was sold for the first time on this date in 1928. Up until that time, consumers baked their own bread or bought it in solid loaves.”

“The greatest thing since sliced bread.” How often have you heard that description of something new on the market?

Wed
06
Nov

State-title bid excites community

Monday morning’s return to the workplaces near the path around the Falls should have found people rested and ready to fire up for the work week. At least one might think so, given an extra hour of sleep on Saturday night due to the return to standard time.

However, for a good number of Panther fans who watched the Panthers take on the Warriors from Waupun, the adrenalin rush from watching Saturday’s volleyball game at Seymour may have kept that from happening. Cruising through the first two games and earning a comfortable lead in the third may have put the Panthers in a relaxed mode. The Warriors took advantage of that lull and came back strong to win the third game.

Wed
30
Oct

Searching for daylight in funding policy

That morning wake-up on the path around the Falls has been a little discouraging lately because of the later arrival of daylight. Given the fact that this past weekend was the last during daylight saving time, there will be a small reprieve starting Sunday when we return to standard time. Unfortunately, the morning reprieve will be offset by an earlier onset of darkness in the evening, which can be just as depressing.

Daylight does wonders for a person’s attitude. The concept of daylight and depression came into play for the last time in another situation Sunday night when the Vikings hosted the Packers at the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome. The Viking fans were so depressed that many began leaving at the start of the fourth quarter. Once they exited the stadium, they were not greeted by daylight to brighten their attitude. Sometimes being a Vikings fan is a heavy load to carry.

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